Racial Discrimination Attorney Referral Service

What is considered Racial Discrimination?

Racial discrimination involves treating an individual, such as a job applicant or an employee, differently or unfavorably because he or she is of a certain race. It also involves treating a job applicant or employee unfavorably because of characteristics they have that are associated with race, such as hair texture, facial features, or skin color.

Additionally, race discrimination can occur when a job applicant or employee is treated unfavorably because they are married to or associated with someone of a particular race or skin color, or because of the person’s connection with an organization or group that is race-based or associated with people of a certain color.

Racial discrimination is not limited to cases where the victim and the discriminating person who are different races. A victim and discriminating person can be of the same race and color.

Under the law, it is illegal to discriminate when it comes to any aspect of employment. This includes:

  • Hiring
  • Firing
  • Pay
  • Job assignments
  • Promotions
  • Layoffs
  • Job training
  • Awarding fringe benefits
  • Any other condition of employment

It is also illegal to harass someone because of their race or skin color. Harassment includes:

  • Using racial slurs
  • Using offensive or derogatory remarks to describe a person’s race or color
  • Displaying racially-offensive symbols

Harassment does not cover teasing, off-hand comments, or isolated incidents that are not “serious.” For harassment to be actual harassment and covered under the law, it must be frequent and severe. The frequency and severity must create a hostile or offensive work environment or result in an adverse employment decision, such as the victim of the harassment being demoted or fired.

Harassment due to race extends to supervisors, co-workers, clients, or customers.

Employment policies and practices can also be viewed as racial discrimination. While most employers have policies or practices that are legal, some employers have guidelines applying to everyone regardless of race or color that have a negative impact on employment of people of a particular race or color. The guideline must also be not related to the job and unnecessary to business operations.

Other examples of racial discrimination in the workplace include assigning African Americans with lighter skin tone to one particular task that deals with the public while those with darker skin are assigned to a task that does not involve dealing with the public and a store that allows white employees to hold sales jobs whereas Latino employees are placed in warehouse positions.

How can I benefit from the assistance of a Racial Discrimination attorney?

Oftentimes, someone who has been discriminated against because of race will not have direct evidence of the discrimination. As a result, it can be hard to prove that the discrimination occurred. Without direct evidence, the person bringing the racial discrimination lawsuit must prove the discrimination indirectly.

Attorneys experienced with handling racial discrimination cases will be well-versed in the law in this area, and they will know what you need to prove, and how it may be proved, in order to be successful on your racial discrimination claim.

Along with providing you with the legal advice you need to be successful in your claim against your employer, your attorney will be able to advise you on the damages you can recover.

Additionally, your lawyer will be able to provide emotional support. Being discriminated against at work, because of your race or skin color can be embarrassing, infuriating, and saddening. Your attorney will help you work through these emotions and issues by helping you understand how you can bring your employer to justice and hold your employer responsible for what you have endured.

For a referral to a properly vetted attorney, contact the Attorney Referral Service of the San Fernando Valley Bar Association (818) 340-4529.